Surfing In The Kingdom

Search County Kerry



County Kerry is a surfers dream. The county has two peninsulas, and part of a third , so no matter what way the wind blows, there is always good surf to be found somewhere in the county. 

"Catch a wave" and "Hang Ten" sound like simple instructions - until you try to stand up on your surfboard! Kerry’s diverse coastline hosts many surf spots from beach to reef to point.

Because Co. Kerry has a large number of tourist visitors each year, the standard of accomodation is high to excellent, with a comfort level and a price range to cater for all ranges, with many of the beaches having caravan and camping facilities. Kerry has some of Irelands longest beaches, including Brandon Bay at 12 miles in length.

The best months in County Kerry for surfing are April to May and September to October. During the winter months there is cold weather, water temperature below 5°C and often-huge swells, or during the summer, long flat periods.

Surfing is becoming more and more popular every year as word spreads about the many and varied surfing spots in The Kingdom of Kerry.

Anascaul River mouth in County Kerry is a fairly exposed beach break that has very consistent surf and works all around the year. Offshore winds blow from the northeast with some shelter here from north winds. Tends to receive a mix of groundswells and windswells and the best swell direction is from the southwest. Waves at the beach break both left and right.

It is a faster take off than Inch reefs with the peak moving around a bit. As it wraps in you get a nice tube and a faster wave. The paddle out is often quite difficult because of the river mouth, good duck diving needed. Best at incoming mid tide. It's sometimes crowded here. Take special care here if it gets very crowded. 

Anascaul village is worth a visit in itself, half way between Tralee and Dingle Town is an unassuming quiet village with more strength and history than most villages in Ireland, let alone County Kerry.  

There is the fact that Anascaul gets its name from the legend of a giant who tried to capture a young girl in the 1st century AD.  Her name was Scal, but his attempt failed when a fierce brave warrior, Cuchulainn, came to the rescue. 

Cuchulainn and the giant threw boulders at each other and fought for days until eventually Cuchulainn was seriously injured and fell. 

Cuchulainn did not die, but Scal thought he had and drowned herself in the lake, which takes its name from her.

Ballybunion 

Ballybunion is an exposed beach reef and point break that has consistent surf and can work at any time of the year. Works best in offshore winds from the east. Wind swells and groundswells in equal measure and the ideal swell direction is from the west. Waves at the beach break both left and right as well as a left hand reef break. Good surf at all stages of the tide. Relatively few surfers here, even on good days. Rocks are a hazard.

There is an excellent surf school in Ballybunion. The surf school is based on Ballybunion's south beach - recognised as one of north Kerry’s best surf spots for the last 20years, its picturesque location and world class surf breaks insure your trip to Ballybunion will be one you will never forget! Surf lessons are run from the beach café where you can enjoy a hot drink and snack after your lesson and avail of our changing facilities.

In the summer they run Surf Summer Camps and also cater to School Tours, ensuring the kids class have a day out they'll remember for years! 
So why not call down and experience the thrill of that first wave in safe and encouraging surroundings at Ballybunion surf School. 

Ballybunion
 

+353 87 7443732

Ballybunionsurfschool@gmail.com

www.ballybunionsurf.com

And as an added bonus. You can also have a Seaweed bath after!!

Ballyheigue 

Ocean waves, sandy beach, mountains of the Dingle peninsula ringing the bay. And the all-important Blue Flag! When the sun shines it's a wonderful bonus. Surfing has become popular on both Ballyheigue and Banna Strand.

If you don't possess a surfboard they are often available for hire. There is a surf school there, providing lessons for children. 

Ballyheigue is an exposed beach and reef break that has reliable surf and can work at any time of the year. The Variety of Wind conditions produce surfable waves, Open to swells from South-West - West direction. Swell sizes are from 1ft - 4ft.

There is easy access, safe rolling waves, perfect for learning. Works best in offshore winds from the east with some shelter here from north winds. 

Ballyheigue tends to receive a mix of groundswells and wind swells and the optimum swell angle is from the west. The beach breaks offer lefts and rights and in addition, both left and right reef breaks add variety. Sometimes crowded. Take care of rocks in the line up.


Ballinskelligs 

There are 3 beaches where surfing is popular in Ballinskelligs. St Finian’s Bay in The Glen has the smallest beach with the strongest rip tides, but often has the best waves. Not a place for the beginner, you need to be able to read the water well, but for the more experienced boarder it can be a thrill.

In Ballinskelligs Bay, Reenroe beach is the longest beach in the area, about 1.2km with a smooth sandy slope and very few rocks. It’s popular with many kinds of surfers, kite surfers in particular have plenty of room here to catch the wind and on the right day with good waves find some serious air. When there are surfing lessons available in the area, this is the beach where they are taught.

Ballinskelligs Bay is a sheltered beach and reef break that does not work very often. Summer in particular tends to be flat. Works best in offshore winds from the northeast. Waves just as likely from local windswells as from distant groundswells and the ideal swell direction is from the southwest.

The beach break offers both left and right hand waves and in addition there are both left and right reef breaks.. The quality of the surf isn't affected by the tide. Even when there are waves, it's not likley to be crowded. Watch out for rocks.

Ballinskelligs beach itself is also popular, again with a smooth gentle slope ideal for beginners but on a good day the waves can be challenging enough for the more experienced boarder.

A stunning beach and with excellent tuition even the first timers manage to get the hang of the surfing and some of the wind surfing. Lots of other water activities available. Highly recommend for a gang of friends, family or anyone travelling in this beautiful part of Kerry !

Saint Finan's Bay is a wonderful little beach where the Kerry mountains fade into the Atlantic Ocean. At high tide, the sand here is almost entirely covered by the sea but at low tide a fair sized beach is uncovered.

St Finnan's Bay is an exposed beach break that has reasonably consistent surf and can work at any time of the year. Offshore winds blow from the northeast with some shelter here from north winds. 

Quite popular in summer, but always friendly. Crystal clear water and the magnificent profile of the Skellig Islands between waves. Scenic Ireland at its very best. 

In terms of wind, waves and weather St. Finan's is an exceptionally exposed location, open to the full force of a SW gale when the surf must get immense, but also offering a wave in West or even big wrapping NW, as well as occasional south swells from Biscay lows.

Also, it is located so far west that like Coomenoole, it must even be exposed to south Atlantic swells in the Irish summer, at about the 20-30cm height and 20 second or longer periods. 

This all goes to make this little beach very consistent in terms of surf, but very prone to being blown out and extremely prone to being cloudy and wet. A good spot to head in summer when all else if flat but in all probability, in winter it will more often be too big than too small. 

In the prevailing west swell conditions, expect two or three foot here when Ballinskelligs and Derrynane are just an unsurfable foot (which is why the local surf schools tend to come here in summer). Peaky lefts and especially rights are the specialty. Best at mid-tide. It can be very good up to head high in light/offshore N or NE winds. 

It would be interesting to know how much swell it can handle before it closes out.



Banna Strand

Banna Beach a Blue Flag beach is renowned as one of the finest sandy and safe beaches in Ireland, stretching from the pleasant village of Ballyheigue on the North to the ancient ruins of Barrow Castle backed by miles of sheltered sand hills, this magnificent stretch of the Atlantic is unparalleled for surfing and swimming.

It is an exposed sandbar break that has dependable surf and can work at any time of the year. Offshore winds blow from the east and there is no shelter here from cross shore breezes. Most of the surf here comes from groundswells and the best swell direction is from the west. The sandbar break offers both left and right hand waves. Likely to be crowded if working.

Swells from the Atlantic Ocean ensure that catching a wave on Banna beach is easy. If you’re a beginner you can use one of the local surf schools or if you’re a pro you’re sure to be challenged.

Wind and Kite Surfers consider Banna beach the most popular location in Ireland. Banna hosts the last competitive event of the year for the Irish Kite Association in October.

The locals are very friendly and there is easy access to the beach. The area has a vulnerable dune system which is protected and is a designated Special Area of Conservation and the site is of major ecological interest due both to its range of habitats and wildfowl. It features fabulous sand dunes along its entire length, some of which rise to 40 feet in height.

And all of this great beauty is set in a stunning landscape of steep mountains and irrepressible sea. The many peaks of Dingle Peninsula merge with broken cloud just across the bay, and great Atlantic rollers break relentlessly along all seven miles of the sandy ocean frontage.  

No problem with public toilets and there are hundreds of car park spaces. There are Council Lifeguards during peak season (lifeguard patrol times are displayed on the information notice board at the beach).

 

Brandon Bay

Brandon Bay is is located on the northern tip of the Dingle Peninsula in the parish of Castlegregory. It is a long 6km crescent shaped bay with a multitude of different peaks scattered along its shoreline. It makes the best of most swells and while non are of any huge quality it can be commended for its consistency, especially in the summer months. In fact the adage goes “if it’s not working in Brandon Bay, it’s not working anywhere!”

Hugely popular with both windsurfers and kite surfers, Brandon Bay has played host to various World Championships and the Red Bull Storm Chase team in the winter of 2013.

It is a large exposed beach break that has pretty consitent surf with many wind/swell options  and can work at any time of the year. The best wind direction is from the southeast. Windswells and groundswells in equal measure and the ideal swell direction is from the northwest. The beach break offers both left and right hand waves. Good surf at all stages of the tide.

The banks are fairly shapeless and lack quality. South of Mossies is a section known as Dumps that can have short barrels. Picks up plenty of swell and is popular with windsurfers.

Park behind the dunes. Be careful when surfing this place to tidy up after you, local farmers don`t take too well to this sort of thing and it could spoil future trips for others. The Bay has received a Beatha Environmental Quality Award for it’s outstanding scenery and cleanliness.

As for the wave just go out and have fun! It works with most winds because of the shape of the bay, and is more popular as a windsurfing spot.

When travelling from Dingle park at the top of the Conor Pass for a birds-eye view of the Bay to decide which peak is working best that day. As the Bay curves eastward towards the Maharees it is generally considered that the surf gets better, but you’ll be surprised by how sizeable and fun it can be.





Coomenoole Beach

 

Coomenoole Beach is located at the far Western tip of the Dingle Peninsula, below the scenic Slea Head Drive.  It is a very small beach and was used as one of the locations for the filming of Ryan`s Daughter. It is the closest beach to Slea Head and the views are dramatic. You will find the beach on the A559 road a few miles before Dunquin. It is oone of the more consistent breaks on the Dingle Peninsula and certainly the most stunning.

If you are up to the challenge I certainly recommend you experience the amazing crystal clear waters in this majestic setting.

There is parking very nearby, and in summer an excellent mobile coffee shop often parks above the beach. The area has become a very popular spot on sunny summer days but for the rest of the year you'd be unlucky to find crowds of surfers in the water.

Coumeenole is a picture perfect beach, one of the finest in Ireland, and the waves are up there too. Facing southwest and very exposed to any swell from that quarter Coumeenole is sheltered from northeast, north, northwest and to some degree, even westerly winds.

Coumeenole is an exposed beach break that has quite consistent surf and can work at any time of the year. The best wind direction is from the northeast with some shelter here from north winds.

Groundswells and wind-swells are equally likely and the ideal swell angle is from the southwest. Waves at the beach are both lefts and rights. Best around low tide when the tide is rising. Even when there are waves, it's not likely to be crowded. Hazards include wreck, rips.

Although only a beach break, Coumeenole can deliver some incredible punch in its waves. The shifting sandbars can produce both lefts and rights of deceptive power and with the correct wind conditions (usually northeast-east) you can get some classy barrels forming.

Exposed to both south and southwest swells Coumeenole is at its best at low to mid tide on the push. Strong rips and a heavy beach dump when swells are larger mean we advise beginners approach this break with caution.

It is often surprising how much of a westerly swell gets in here because it looks like it should be mostly blocked by the Blasket Islands. Somehow enough gets through. A Westerly swell of just 1.8 m and 8 seconds is about the minimum that will produce surf able waves here, at about knee to waist high but if the same size swell comes from the SW or if a 3m swell comes from the west, it will be head-high and excellent.

This makes Coumeenole a very good bet on days when west winds accompany a small to moderate west swell - a very common situation in this part of Ireland, especially in summer. At these times, Coumeenole can be pretty much the only surf able spot in the area because most spots in Dingle are blown out in westerly wind. In a northwest wind, the contrast is even greater - head-high onshore mush at Brandon Bay versus pristine little waves here and clean and flat as a tack at Inch Reef.

Expect to find some of the clearest water in Europe and plenty of harmless marine life. Low to mid tide dishes up very peaky waves that are very easy to get into. As the tide pushes up onto the bank at the back of the bay, the waves tend to get heavier and at high tide the close out is probably best left to sponge boarders who can get little cover-ups.

Although I have never surfed here when the waves are overhead, this must happen frequently outside of summer. I have no idea whether or not the break can handle very big winter swells, which must easily exceed 10 feet here, but I have it on good account that at 6 foot it is just fine.

Beware bathers in summer. Strong currents. Deceptively strong waves. Difficult to predict break, stick to one spot left or right (depending on preference) and wait for peak. Fast up needed, can be dumpy. really powerful waves that tube with a nice off shore wind a real strong ledgy wave. One of my favourite spots that offers both right and left breaks depending on what wind is there



Derrynane

 

Derrynane Blue Flag beach is a gem on Ring of Kerry. When the sun shines, the white sand give the waters the most perfect and appealing Greek Island blue colour that forces you to wade out to surf the waves.

The beach is safe and the white sands can make it look exotic in the sun.  Derrynane is perfect for families, swimming, walking and all water sports including great surfing. There is however a small section of beach not suitable for swimming due to dangerous currents and this area is marked with warning signs.

Derrynane however has a quite exposed beach break that has pretty consistent surf and can work at any time of the year. The best wind direction is from the northeast. Waves just as likely from local windswells as from distant groundswells and the ideal swell direction is from the southwest. The beach breaks offer lefts and rights. Good surf at all stages of the tide. Rarely crowded here for surfers.

The exposed and rugged Atlantic coastline for the more experienced is only a short distance away from Caherdaniel and Derrynane. Whatever your preferred water activity then this County Kerry coastline will be sure to please. This location will challenge the most competitive surfing enthusiasts, while at the same time nearby offers a gentler environment for beginners of all ages.



Dumps

Named after its behaviour on high tide, due to the dumping shore break found here at high tide. The prevailing south west wind is side-onshore here which gives good port tack jumping conditions, make sure you don`t get dumped onto the rocks.  Dumps is the perfect spot for beginners and experienced surfers alike. A flat beach that provides soft rolling wave for beginners on low tide and faster steeper wave at high. 

Dumps is a great spot for hanging out and meeting the locals. It can get busy here during the holidays but generally it has a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Dumps works on well from low to high tides and if the wind has any east in it.

It is a quite exposed beach break that has reasonably consistent surf and can work at any time of the year. The best wind direction is from the east. Groundswells and windswells are equally likely and the ideal swell angle is from the northwest. The beach break provides left and right handers; the best winds are south and north which give side shore winds with good jumping and wave riding. When it's working here, it can get crowded.

A friend of mine loves to body board there all day any day (regardless of the weather!). I normally stay at the Station houses self-catering houses in the village itself, just a stroll from the pubs shops etc. of course you could just pitch a tent in the dunes and enjoy the view for free.

There is a sandy carpark by the side of the road where you can rig up and get beach access from. It is best avoided at high tide in big swells for the reasons mentioned earlier but at these times it is better to sail further north in the bay.

Waterworld and Jamie Knox Surf schools are found at Dumps beach. On the right of the spit you will find O’Connor’s Stables, here you can rent horses to trek through the sand dunes or gallop along the endless 13 km beach of Brandon Bay.

From Tralee follow signposts for Dingle, as you pass through Camp keep going straight for Castlegregory. About 15 minutes down the road take the right hand turn for Castlegregory and drive through the town.

After you pass the Spar shop on your right take the next right turn (Signposted for Spillane’s Bar). Drive over a narrow bridge to get onto the Maharees Peninsula, and pass a small sandy bay ("Sandy Bay") on your right.

The spot is about 750m beyond Sandy Bay on the left hand side of the road. You will see an opening in the Sand Dunes which you can park in and get access to the beach.



Garywilliam Point

Maharees or Magharees (Na Machairí) is a 5 km long sandy spit located on the northern side of the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry.

Lengthy beaches are found on both sides of the peninsula, which separates Brandon Bay on the western side from Tralee Bay to the east. The Brandon Bay beaches are open to the North Atlantic and often receive long rolling swells, which can provide excellent surf given suitable wind and tide conditions.

Garywilliam Point at the very tip of The Maharees is an exposed point break that has very consistent surf and works all around the year.

This wave is not for the average surfer, you have to be able to do a seriously good bottom turn off a steep take off. This wave breaks 12 feet from dry rock and the bigger it is the further out it breaks (deeper water!!).

Ideal winds are from the southeast. Most of the surf here comes from groundswells and the best swell direction is from the northwest. Best around low tide. The best swell is North, North West, West.

Even when there are waves, it's not likley to be crowded. Hazards include rocks and rips.



Inch Reefs

The head of Dingle Bay is cut off by two narrow sand-hill promontories – one an offshoot of the Dingle Peninsula at Rossbeigh – which enclose the harbour of Castlemaine and the other Situated on the inner side of the Dingle promontory, and facing south, is the sheltered seaside resort of Inch.

Inch, one of the most beautiful beaches in Ireland, four miles long, firm sandy and golden with magnificent scenery. Inch has a magnificent four-mile strand of firm golden sand.

Under inaccessible cliffs west of Inch Strand is Inch reefs. It is a quite exposed point break that has pretty consistent surf and can work at any time of the year. Recently voted as one of the Top 10 Best Waves in Ireland by Irish surf magazine Tonnta, Inch Reef is the jewel in Kerry’s surfing crown.

About half a dozen times a year you will see line upon line of waves stretched to the horizon like corduroy trousers eventually peeling into stunning long rights with rides often lasting as long as 300-400m.

 Ideal winds are from the northeast with some shelter here from north winds. A wave just as likely from local wind swells as from distant groundswells and the best swell direction is from the southwest and the bigger the better. Can be very fickle as it’s quite exposed to the winds and be on the watch for strong currents.



The wave quality is totally epic and I must say for experienced surfers. Good place to watch your mates do their stuff while you make the effortless paddle out around the break. The best break is at high tide which makes for problems leaving the water. Surfable waves up to 10 foot. Make sure you have a suitable exit point figured out before you paddle in.

Park your car about half a kilometer along the R559 from Inch Strand and find your way down the small track in the cliff side. Entry and exit into the water can be very tricky and some prefer to ride the wave all the way into the beach and run back up the road.

Inch Strand

Inch is a great surf spot on the Dingle Peninsula loop of the unbelievably scenic Wild Atlantic Way; the strand juts out to sea for 4 miles. Inch has both a big, a beautiful strand which can also provide some good quality beach break waves. It is more of a long board wave or a beginner’s wave, best at mid tide.

The strand is especially suited to longboards and a long; much-lusted after right hand break off the reef that many surfers are still waiting for their chance to ride. Rocky and reefy on the bottom. Super friendly locals at the surf school on the beach (open in summer).

The northern end is normally the best part of the beach; it receives good protection from north-westerly winds and is the easiest place to paddle out from when the waves are big. For windsurfing the prevailing wind is west to south west onshore.

It is a quite exposed beach break that has pretty consistent surf and can work at any time of the year. The best wind direction is from the east with some shelter here from north winds.

Tends to receive a mix of groundswells and wind swells and the ideal swell angle is from the southwest. Waves at the beach are both lefts and rights. Best around mid tide. It's sometimes crowded here.

Mossies

Mossies, another great spot for surfing on The Maharees. Mossies is described as one of the best surfing waves in Europe. The peak breaks left to right, and picks up any direction of swell (best at NW). 

A beautiful long sandy Blue flagged beach. Many wind and swell options along the curved bay. Bigger waves towards the Magharees and smaller towards Kilcummen. Mossies reef and Garry William Point for experienced only.

It is a fairly exposed reef break that has quite reliable surf and can work at any time of the year, a Mellow offshore reef peak, named after the farmer that first witnessed surfers there. Access from Garywilliam Point as it’s a long paddle from the beach.

Tends to receive a mix of groundswells and wind swells and the ideal swell direction is from the northwest. When the surf is up, it can get quite busy in the water. Watch out for rocks. Very experienced surfers only.

This wave brings together the kinship and personality of the Kerry surfer and a gentle rolling right hander that is fun more than epic within an environment that is absolutely mind blowing-thank you for the experience! Let us all hope it stays that way. There isn`t any surfing on low tide due to a rocky reef. 

Rossbeigh Strand

Rossbeigh Strand is a stunning location with views across to The Dingle Peninsula, backed by cliffs and the Ring of Kerry. Just outside the Town of Glenbeigh you will find a stretch of one of the finest beaches in Ireland, 5 Kilometres of uninterrupted beach, pointing out into Dingle Bay.

Fine soft sand with the sea on either side. The strand is safe for swimming, great for surfers, ideal for horse riding, and there is a nearby pub.

To find the beach bear right at the fork in the road as you leave Glenbeigh heading for Cahersiveen. Lots of wildlife here too. Fun waves, with some more punchy waves to be found along the beach. Lifeguarded in the summer, West coast Board riders surf school operate here sometimes, providing lessons and hire.

It is a wonderful location for swimming, water sports, walking and great for surfing. There is also the opportunity to go horse riding on the beach.  

For surfing it is a fairly exposed beach break that has pretty consistent surf and can work at any time of the year. Works best in offshore winds from the northeast with some shelter here from north winds. Waves just as likely from local wind swells as from distant groundswells and the best swell direction is from the west southwest.

The beach break offers both left and right hand waves. The quality of the surf isn't affected by the tide. Home to fun beach breaks and has a boulder, left hand point at the north end that requires a long paddle. When it's working here, it can get crowded.

Lots of parking, and facilities, a great place for beginners to intermediates. Gets quite warm in the summer and its life guarded too.

Sandy Bay

Sandy Bay in County Kerry is a sheltered beach break that has fairly consistent surf and can work at any time of the year and the wave quality can be totally epic at times.

This is a HEAVY HEAVY wave. Can hold size up to 15ft and you can get some immense barrels. The locals will beat the shit out of you if you drop in or if you are from cork.

Therefore it is best for experienced surfers, the best wind direction is from the west. Waves just as likely from local wind swells as from distant groundswells and the optimum swell angle is from the north northwest.

The beach break offers both left and right hand waves. Good surf at all stages of the tide. Unlikely to be too crowded, even when the surf is up.

Scraggane Bay

Scraggane Bay At the north end of the Maharees Peninsula is very popular with surfers and windsurfers. A fantastic spectators viewing spot with a sand and shingle beach, good for experienced surfers and swimmers with strong currents, but unfortunately not suitable for children.

In stormy conditions you get unbelievably strong winds. In high tide, caution must also be taken in and out of water as the waves reach the rocks by the dunes. Experienced surfers (and we mean experienced), will find sizeable reef breaks.

Scraggane Bay is popular for windsurfing due to its consistent wind and its protection from the Atlantic waves. "Scraggies" is sailable in almost any conditions, regardless of wind direction. Local windsurf pro Jamie Knox has a base on the bay - see http://www.jamieknox.com for more information on water sports in the Brandon Bay area.

Scraggane Bay is a fairly exposed beach break that has quite consistent surf and can work at any time of the year. Offshore winds blow from the southeast. Tends to receive a mix of groundswells and wind swells and the best swell direction is from the west northwest.

The beach breaks offer lefts and rights. The quality of the surf isn't affected by the tide. Even when there are waves, it's not likely to be crowded.  A 5 star PADI certified dive centre is located at the fishing harbor of the bay.

The area is popular also with holidaying surfers and kite surfers, who sometimes drive all the way from central Europe to experience these waters. There is limited accommodation locally and you might find it best to drive and rent one of the nearby holiday homes. Roads can be narrow and you never know when that tractor is going to appear from around the bend, so take caution when you drive.

Just drive past Jamie Knox surf center and the green room bar all the way to the sea and you are at Scraggane Bay. It was good to get to Spillanes bar at the end of the day and recharge my batteries with some great pub food, which will fuel your evening walk around the bays.



Smerwick Harbour

Smerwick Harbour resides on the Dingle Peninsula and is situated immediately east of the renowned Three Sisters coastal peaks upon the Dingle peninsula’s north west corner. It is an open picturesque bay and offers medium to good surfing conditions. 

It is a sheltered reef break that only works once in a while with no particular seasonal pattern. Offshore winds are from the southeast. Wind swells and groundswells in equal measure and the best swell direction is from the north northwest.

There is no beach break and there is a right hand reef break as well. Best around mid tide. Even when there are waves, it's not likley to be crowded.

Please note the bay should be avoided in winter as it is very exposed to the heavy ground swell that rolls in uninterruptedly from the Atlantic Ocean.

The Harbour is thought to be one of the most beautiful in all of Ireland. Likewise bounded by the villages of Baile an Fheirtéaraigh, Baile na nGall the area is what has been known as the Fíor-Ghaeltacht, or true Gaeltacht, where the Irish language is spoken by everyone.

This provides this remote area with not alone a great beauty but the local people with a special and unique charm. It is truly a heaven surfers, hikers and anyone who has any interest in ancient Irish culture.

Smerwick was originally a Viking settlement and its name originates from the Norse words ‘smoer’ and ‘wick’ meaning ‘butter harbour’.

Although denoted as Smerwick on charts the area is now officially known by the Irish name ‘Ard na Caithne’, meaning ‘height of the arbutus’ or strawberry tree. Technically the name Smerwick lost all legal standing under the 2004 Place Names Order that was applicable to Gaeltacht Regions.

Stoney Gap

Last but not least is Stoney Gap. Situated between the two Sandy bay caravan parks on the Brandon bay side. Cross shore winds are south to south west, best at mid tide. It is good in north-west in a small swell but dangerous in a big swell. Surfing can be good at low tide.

Stoney Gap is another surfing beach on the Maharees, that 5 km long mound of land located on the north side of the Dingle Peninsula, halfway between Tralee and Dingle and is famous for its long gold beaches, pushed flat and green into the wind-ruffled clean water of Tralee Bay.

Stoney Gap is an exposed beach break that has fairly consistent surf and can work at any time of the year. The best wind direction is from the east southeast. A wave just as likely from local wind swells as from distant groundswells and the ideal swell angle is from the northwest. The beach breaks offer lefts and rights. Best around mid tide. When it's working here, it can get crowded.

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